NOVEMBER SPAWNED A MONSTER

Sleep on and dream of Love
Because it's the closest you will
Get to love
Poor twisted child
So ugly, so ugly
Poor twisted child
Oh hug me, oh hug me
One November
Spawned a monster
In the shape of this child
Who later cried :

"But Jesus made me, so
Jesus save me from
pity, sympathy
And people discussing me"
A frame of useless limbs
What can make GOOD
All the BAD that's been done ?

And if the lights were out
Could you even bear
To kiss her full on the mouth
(Or anywhere?)

Oh, poor twisted child
So ugly, so ugly
Poor twisted child
Oh hug me, oh hug me
One November
Spawned a monster
In the shape of this child
Who must remain
A hostage to kindness
And the wheels underneath her
A hostage to kindness
And the wheels underneath her

A symbol of where mad, mad lovers
Must PAUSE and draw the line.
So sleep and dream of love
Because it's the closest
You will get to love
That November
Is a time
Which I must
Put OUT of my mind

Oh, one fine day
Let it be soon
She won't be rich or beautiful
But she'll be walking your streets
In the clothes that she went out
And chose for herself.


A controversial mini-epic in which Moz seems to be poking fun at the disabled, in contradiction to his sympathetic hearing-aid adornment at a Top Of The Pops show. This controversy was heightened by an apparently similarly-themed Mute Witness on Kill Uncle.
Unlike the comic tone of Mute Witness, however, this song is altogether more grave and serious. The author appears to be torn between pity and revulsion as he sways between the heartless "Poor twisted child" and the empathic "So hug me". He sings "hug me" and then macabrely ponders the situation of physical contact.
A sharp atheistic viewpoint is put forward by describing the disabled girl's impassioned cry for Jesus to save her from "pity, sympathy and people discussing me".
At times the author almost seems to comparing their situation with the girl's; they carefully refer to "your streets", implying that the author is as alienated from the urban streets as the girl is. A simple hope to fend for herself seems mirrored in the author's despairing look at the world.
Mary Margaret O'Hara provided the eerie wailing of what has to be assumed is the disabled girl, adding another black and deeply unpleasant comic element to the song.

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