PICCADILLY PALARE

Off the rails I was and
Off the rails
I was happy to stay
GET OUT OF MY WAY
On the rack I was
Easy meat, and a reasonably good buy
A reasonably good buy

The Piccadilly palare
Was just silly slang
Between me and the boys in my gang
"So Bona to Vada. OH YOU
Your lovely eek and
Your lovely riah"

We plied an ancient trade
Where we threw all life's
Instructions away
Exchanging lies and digs (my way)
Cause in a belted coat
Oh, I secretly knew
That I hadn't a clue

(No, no. No, no, no. You can't get there that way. Follow me...)

The Piccadilly palare
Was just silly slang
Between me and the boys in my gang
Exchanging palare
You wouldn't understand
Good sons like you
NEVER DO.

So why do you smile
When you think about Earl's Court ?
But you cry when you think of all
The battles you've fought (and lost) ?
It may all end tomorrow
Or it could go on forever
In which case I'm doomed
It could go on forever
In which case I'm doomed

Bona Drag ...


Morrissey starts off the compilation with a catchy and upbeat single track featuring Suggs as guest vocalist. A strong melody is coupled with Morrissey speculating on "easy meat", slipping in a quick reference to central Manchester. An indication that "Bona Drag" was originally intended to be an album can be found in the vocal coda.
The "Piccadilly Palare" was slang used in the gay London of the 60s. Several words are used in this song :

bona - good
drag - clothes
vada - see, look at
eek - face
riah - hair

The source that Morrissey used was a radio show from the 1960s called "Round The Horne". It starred Kenneth Williams and Hugh Paddick, who played two homosexuals. Each show was on a different topic and was named things like "Bona Law" (hence Bona Drag). This show used the words above, plus several others.


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