BARBARISM BEGINS AT HOME

Unruly boys
Who will not grow up
Must be taken in hand
Unruly girls
Who will not settle down
They must be taken in hand

A crack on the head
Is what you get for not asking
And a crack on the head
Is what you get for asking

Unruly boys
Who will not grow up
Must be taken in hand
Unruly girls
Who will not settle down
They must be taken in hand

A crack on the head
Is what you get for not asking
And a crack on the head
Is what you get for asking

No ... a crack on the head
Is what you get for not asking
And a crack on the head
Is what you get for asking

A crack on the head
Is just what you get
WHY ? Because of who you are !
And a crack on the head
Is just what you get
WHY ? Because of what you are !
A crack on the head
Because of :
Those things you said
Things you said
The things you did

Unruly boys
Who will not grow
Must be taken in hand
Unruly girls
Who will not grow
They must be taken in hand
Ah ... oh, no ... oh, no
Ah ... oh, no ... oh, no
No ... no, no, no
No ... no, no


Steven Patrick returns to the brutality theme of "The Headmaster Ritual", but this time it's looking at the children's homes. The Hobson's choice of what should be said at what time is something every child will recognise.
Famously, the vocal at points breaks into bizarre animal noises as one of The Smiths' best ever basslines makes the band's most funky song. Acting as a showcase for Marr's increasingly professional songwriting talents, the live version of this song was brutally frenetic, with the singer often putting aside the lyrics to concentrate on making the most frightening sounds possible.
This song was originally premiered live in December 1983. The song often lasted more than 15 minutes in its live incarnation, and Pete Burns once joined Morrissey on stage at the Royal Albert Hall for a duetted version.

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