WHAT SHE SAID

What she said :
"How come someone hasn't noticed
That I'm dead
And decided to bury me ?
God knows, I'm ready !"

La-la-la ...

What she said was sad
But then, all the rejection she's had
To pretend to be happy
Could only be idiocy
La-la-la ...

What she said was not for the job or
Lover that she never had
Oh ...
No no no ...

What she read
All heady books
She'd sit and prophesise
(It took a tattooed boy from
Birkenhead
To really really open her eyes)

What she read
All heady books
She'd sit and prophesise
(It took a tattooed boy from
Birkenhead
To really really open her eyes)

What she said :
"I smoke 'cos I'm hoping for an
Early death
AND I NEED TO CLING TO SOMETHING !"

What she said :
"I smoke 'cos I'm hoping for an
Early death
AND I NEED TO CLING TO SOMETHING !"

No no no no ...


An unoriginal title shades an excellent song, despite its huge debt to Elizabeth Smart's "By Grand Central Station I Sat Down And Wept" (see Sources). It might be suggested that song is about her, in fact, although I don't know where her real-life lover George Barker was from. A funk-led and powerful backing to Morrissey's manic vocal lends extra weight to an already powerful lyrical punch.
This song is packed full of excellent rambunctious jokes, with twists in sentences "What she said was not for the job or/Lover that she never had", and amusing afterthoughts - the boy from Birkenhead etc.
An excellent rocker that confounds anyone trying to label Morrissey as fey and ineffectual.
David Brazil has this to say :

"This song seems to bear a debt not only to Elizabeth Smart but to the Beatles song "She Said, She Said" on their album Revolver. There is, of course, the similarity between the titles. But both songs also share the same conceit: a man singing about a depressed, perhaps overly depressed, and self-involved woman. Certainly the Smiths song is more clever at illustrating the point. But just as Morrissey's girl complains: "How come someone hasn't noticed that I'm dead?", the "She" of the Beatles song insists: "I know what it's like to be dead". The major difference is that in the Lennon/McCartney song there is a definite suggestion that the singer has had a romantic relationship with the melancholy femme in question, whereas Morrissey seems to be singing about an acquaintance. This may be because early Beatles inevitably turned everything into a straightforward love song, because Moz can't turn anything into a straightforward love song, or (my theory) a combination of both."


 Back to Meat Is Murder index