A RUSH AND A PUSH AND THE LAND IS OURS

OH HELLO
I am the ghost of Troubled Joe
Hung by his pretty white neck
Some eighteen months ago
I travelled to a mystical time zone
And I missed my bed
And I soon came home

They said :
"There's too much caffeine
In your bloodstream
And a lack of real spice
In your life"

I said :
"Leave me alone
Because I'm alright, dad
Surprised to still
Be on my own..."

Oh, but don't mention love
I'd hate the strain of the pain again
A rush and a push and the land that
We stand on is ours
It has been before
So it shall be again
And people who are uglier than you and I
They take what they need, and just leave

Oh, but don't mention love
I'd hate the pain of the strain all over again
A rush and a push and the land that
We stand on is ours
It has been before
So why can't it be now ?
And people who are weaker than you or I
They take what they want from life

Oh, but don't mention love
No - no, don't mention love !
A rush and a push and the land that
We stand on is ours
Your youth may be gone
But you're still a young man
So phone me, phone me, phone me
So phone me, phone me, phone me

Oh, I think I'm in love
Oh, I think I'm in love
Oh, I think I'm in love (think I'm in love)
Urrgh, I think I'm in lerv
Oh ...


A brilliant opening track, rich and lush in its music, with Morrissey producing one of his finest growling vocal performances.
Morrissey starts by introducing himself as the "ghost of Troubled Joe" and tells us about his travels to "mystical time zones". This is sharply belittled by dietary advice from the character's father, before he reacts in horror to the idea of falling in love again. He returns to his common theme of misfits triumphing over "people who are uglier than you or I" (also probably referring to his vanity: "the only thing to be in '83 is handsome"); later this is amended to "weaker", implying, in full irony, that his mis-fit population are stronger for not falling into the trap of the ordinary boys.
This song also features a welcome return of unsubtle homosexual references, whereby the old-young man is urged "phone me, phone me, phone me".
Rourke said of this song "[it] stands out because it didn't have any guitars on it at all. I thought that was a first."

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