BIGMOUTH STRIKES AGAIN

Sweetness, sweetness I was only joking
When I said I'd like to smash every tooth
In your head

Oh ... sweetness, sweetness, I was only joking
When I said by rights you should be
Bludgeoned in your bed

And now I know how Joan of Arc felt
Now I know how Joan of Arc felt
As the flames rose to her roman nose
And her Walkman started to melt
Oh ...

Bigmouth, la ... bigmouth, la ...
Bigmouth strikes again
And I've got no right to take my place
With the Human race

Oh, bigmouth, la ... bigmouth, la
Bigmouth strikes again
And I've got no right to take my place
With the Human race

And now I know how Joan of Arc felt
Now I know how Joan of Arc felt
As the flames rose to her roman nose
And her hearing aid started to melt

Bigmouth, la ... bigmouth, la ...
Bigmouth strikes again
And I've got no right to take my place
With the Human race
Oh ...

Bigmouth, oh ... bigmouth, la ...
Bigmouth strikes again
And I've got no right to take my place
With the Human race
Oh ...

Bigmouth, oh ... bigmouth, la ...
Bigmouth strikes again
And I've got no right to take my place
With the Human race
Oh ...

Bigmouth, oh ... bigmouth, la ...
Bigmouth strikes again
And I've got no right to take my place
With the Human race
Oh ...


A bombastic single with a powerful performance from Marr and a biting vocal. A speeded-up Morrissey occasionally accompanies the vocal proper, giving an eerie effect (this is credited to Ann Coates in the "The Queen Is Dead" sleeve, a pun on an area of Manchester).
I've found that most people new to The Smiths initially pick this track as favourite, whereas later it tends to grate a little bit.
Morrissey marries the old with the new in these lyrics, mentioning Joan of Arc's Walkman, seeming to imply that the situation under discussion (i.e. the protagonist saying very much the wrong thing, like his thoughts of angered violence) has been going on forever and will go on forever. Of course, he is pointing out a similarity between him and Joan of Arc rather melodramatically, lending a quite comical tone to what could have been an empty vessel. Painting Joan of Arc's talk of God's communications as something that "just slipped out" is in stark contrast to his harsh sentence upon himself "I've got no right to take my place with the Human race".
The sleeve lyrics to this song provide one example of Morrissey's Wildean propensity to capitalise nouns such as Human and Love. His mention of Joan the Arc's hearing aid is surely a reference to the contraption he wore on Top of the Pops.

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