SOME GIRLS ARE BIGGER THAN OTHERS

From the ice-age to the dole-age
There is but one concern
I have just discovered :

Some girls are bigger than others
Some girls are bigger than others
Some girl's mothers are bigger than
Other girl's mothers

Some girls are bigger than others
Some girls are bigger than others
Some girl's mothers are bigger than
Other girl's mothers

As Anthony said to Cleopatra
As he opened a crate of ale :

Oh, I say :
Some girls are bigger than others
Some girls are bigger than others
Some girl's mothers are bigger than
Other girl's mothers

Some girls are bigger than others
Some girls are bigger than others
Some girl's mothers are bigger than
Other girl's mothers

Send me the pillow ...
The one that you dream on ...
Send me the pillow ...
The one that you dream on ...
And I'll send you mine


An amazingly well realised song that is fine testament to Marr's unique composing abilities. In many ways, the apex of a brilliant album, a deeply emotional music is somehow untempered in effect by Morrissey's irrational decision to heap one of his "comedy" lyrics on to it. Quite how The Smiths managed to make Morrissey's absurd lyrics sound so delicate and beautiful I don't know.
The Anthony And Cleopatra referred to are from the classic Carry On Cleo. The coda is in part borrowed from Johnny Tillotson's 1962 hit "Send Me The Pillow You Dream On".
I do very much like the lyrics however. The chorus means exactly what you think it means; Morrissey said that for years he had never realised that, um, some girls are bigger than others.

Roddy Ashworth has suggested that the curious fade in/out at the start is not on purpose :

Engineers and producers often "spoil" mixes they send to record companies so they cannot be used. The most common way of doing this is by whacking the faders down to just below half (to throw to haywire the noise reduction systems) within the first 30 seconds - just as in "Some Girls". It means the client gets a good idea of the mix but also something totally unreleasable.
Normally this is done to ensure payment for a track. My only guess is that production on all aspects of TQID was so behind schedule, and Rough Trade were in such a hurry to get it out, they didn't bother to check the master too thoroughly.

The live version often had an extra verse, to wit :

On the shopfloor
There's a calendar
As obvious as snow ...
(As if we didn't know)


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