SUEDEHEAD

Why do you come here ?
And why do you hang around ?
I'm so sorry
I'm so sorry

Why do you come here
When you know it makes things hard for me ?
When you know, oh
Why do you come ?
Why do you telephone ? (Hmm...)
And why send me silly notes ?
I'm so sorry
I'm so sorry

Why do you come here
When you know it makes things hard for me ?
When you know, oh
Why do you come ?
You had to sneak into my room
'just' to read my diary
"It was just to see, just to see"
(All the things you knew I'd written about you...)
Oh, so many illustrations
Oh, but
I'm so very sickened
Oh, I am so sickened now

Oh, it was a good lay, good lay
It was a good lay, good lay
It was a good lay, good lay
Oh
It was a good lay, good lay
It was a good lay, good lay
Oh, it was a good lay, good lay
Oh
Oh, it was a good lay
It was a good lay
Oh, a good lay
Oh, it was a good lay
Good lay, good lay
Oh
It was a good lay
It was a good lay


A fine example of Morrissey's by now finely honed single instinct. An extremely strong song for the radio, his debut single shocked many a doom-merchant who had predicted that Mozzer wouldn't be able to hack it outside The Smiths (as Morrissey himself did, once calling the band his "life-support machine").
Probably Stephen Street's finest composition, it is still fresh today. Morrissey once again displays his fine ability for clever lyrics; there are two obvious interpretations to the song. One, that the protagonist truly doesn't want the person under question around, a notion seemingly scuppered by the admission of his many illustrations (of course, there is no indication as to whether the "illustrations" are of a good or bad nature). The other suggestion is that the author very much does want "silly notes" (possibly a reference to one of Morrissey's adolescent classroom habits, communicating with fellow pupils by means of scribbled messages); indeed, the emotions are so strong that they are almost unwelcome; the protagonist could do without the incredible stress of love in his life. This suggestion is borne out by the line "Why do you come here when you know it makes things hard for me ?".
At the end of the song, the author reflects upon the situation with flippant grace, and not a touch of humour.
The title is named after a book by Richard Allen about violent teenagers. This further endorses the interpretations (a "suedehead" is the fashionable equivalent of a skinhead i.e. someone with hair who is just as violent). Many people also comment

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