THE NATIONAL FRONT DISCO

David, the wind blows
The wind blows ...
Bits of your life away
Your friends all say ...
"Where is our boy ? Oh, we've lost our boy"
But they should know
Where you've gone
Because again and again you've explained that
You're going to ...

Oh, you're going to ...
Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah
England for the English !
England for the English !

David, the winds blow
The winds blow ...
All of my dreams away
And I still say :
"Where is our boy ? Ah, we've lost our boy"
But I should know
Why you've gone
Because again and again you've explained
You've gone to the ...

National, ah ...
To the National ..
There's a country; you don't live there
But one day you would like to
And if you show them what you're made of
Oh, then you might do ...

But David, we wonder
We wonder if the thunder
Is ever really gonna begin
Begin, begin
Your mom says :
"I've lost my boy"
But she should know
Why you've gone
Because again and again you've explained
You've gone to the :

National
To the National
To the National Front Disco
Because you want the day to come sooner
You want the day to come sooner
You want the day to come sooner
When you've settled the score

Oh, the National
Oh, the National
Oh, the National
Oh, the National
Oh, the National


The controversy rollercoaster rides on again, a.k.a. the simple-minded mis-interpretation game. Just because a song contains the line "England For The English" doesn't automatically mean the author has a Union Jack tattooed on his arse. If any reasonable criticism could be made, it's that the title of the song is in poor taste, which I'm sure to some people it is; to me, it's just funny.
A fine tune and a madcap insane finish buck up the energy of the album just in time for the chirpy next track, Certain People I Know. Morrissey sings of a son lost to the National Front (a racist organisation in the UK), and their mistaken beliefs in a forthcoming country where everything's OK due to it being wholly "white". Of course the contrast between the NF's beliefs as commented on by Morrissey here, and his own fantasy of a verdant lost England of old, is there to be made; it's not accident that this song follows We'll Let You Know.

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